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Reducing CO2 emissions in the building sector: A PUSH FOR NEW BUILDINGS OR DISCOVERING THE POTENTIAL IN EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE? The case of Budapest

Roundtable
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Tuesday, February 25, 2020, 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Energy Policy Research Group (EPRG) and Jean Monnet Chair in Energy and Innovation invites you to
a roundtable discussion

Reducing CO2 emissions in the building sector:
A PUSH FOR NEW BUILDINGS OR DISCOVERING THE POTENTIAL IN EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE?
The case of Budapest

 

Date and Time: 25 February, 13:30 – 15:30
Central European University, Budapest, Nador 15, rm 101 Quantum

 

Roundtable Panelists:

  • Éva Beleznay, Senior Sustainability Consultant, HuGBC

  • Hornok Edina, Head of Sustainability Consultancy, DVM Group

  • Levente Polyák, Researcher and Urban Planner, Hungarian Contemporary Architecture Centre (KÉK)

  • Zsombor Barta, Sustainability Expert and President of the Hungarian Green Building Council (HuGBC)

  • and Logan Strenchock, Environmental and Sustainability Officer, Central European University, as the moderator

The building sector is responsible for almost 40% of global CO2 emissions. Building emissions are a combination of two things: energy use for lighting, heating and cooling, and the amount generated through construction, such as the production and transport of raw building materials. As we become more aware of the urgent need to reduce material consumption, a growing movement from within the building sector urges the necessity to prioritize re-usage and refurbishment of existing built infrastructure, while also completely challenging the notion of building itself, striving for longevity, flexibility, adaptability and material recovery.

Therefore, pressing questions remain: Is the best pathway for drastically reducing the carbon and material footprint of construction building new, highly efficient buildings, or prioritizing the renovation and refurbishment of existing infrastructure? Why are many major construction projects initiated with little public discourse while being financed with public funds? What role can building professionals play in influencing local municipal strategies for urban development and sustainable building legislation? What are the unforeseen social impacts of a real estate and construction sector which prioritizes new building in the urban landscape?

We encourage you to join us to debate these questions and more within the context of Budapest with an invited panel of local urban design and construction experts.

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