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Long Night of Research

Fair
Flyer LNdF
Friday, May 20, 2022, 5:00 pm – 11:00 pm

This Event takes place on-site at the CEU / QS Campus in Vienna.

The Long Night of Research will take place on 20 May 2022 from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. at over 280 exhibition venues across Austria. In all nine federal provinces you can discover, with free admission, what otherwise often remains hidden: exciting, surprising, amazing!

CEU is participating at the Long Night of Research for the first time! Find out more about the CEU at this event here and see the program below.

With over 2,500 stations, guided tours, workshops, lectures, live presentations and experiments to watch, participate in and marvel at, the Long Night of Research offers something for everyone: for science professionals and those who want to become science professionals, for the adventurous and the curious, for those who think outside the box, for tinkerers, for young and old explorers and for everyone who wants to know exactly.

Research is multifaceted
From society, environment and health to natural sciences, technology, energy, economy, digitalisation and culture, researchers present their achievements! This ranges from pre-scientific work at schools to cutting-edge research, from basic research to leading projects in application-oriented research or successful innovations from companies.

The CEU is represented at the Long Night of Research by the Department of Cognitive Science and the Cognitive Development Center, the Department of Network and Data Science, the Department of Economics and Business and by the Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy as well as by the Nationalism Studies Program and by the Visual Studies Platform.

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Everyday obstacles – through the eyes of Roma Hungarians

This program features two short advocacy documentaries by CEU academic staff that were part of the Misrecognition of Minorities in Europe (MisMiE) project, a collaboration among a number of European Universities, funded by the Volkswagen Foundation. The project’s aim was to develop an understanding of misrecognition as a major dimension in the contemporary experience of minorities in Europe.  The research team collaborated with young Roma volunteers who bravely showed us examples of the discrimination they face during routine activities in their daily lives, such as shopping or renting a flat. The videos were picked up as a story by the Hungarian independent news outlets, 444.hu and telex.hu and the television program RTL Fókusz, and have gotten over 570 000 views. The screening will be followed by a discussion with creators and researchers. 

Short documentaries

5:15 p.m. 

Registration via web

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CEU DOCS: Documentary Shorts by CEU Students

The Visual Studies Platform and CEU Library present a selection of short documentary films by CEU students in the Visual Theory and Practice Certificate program (VTP). Visitors can discuss with the creators of the films and with Jeremy Braverman, Head of Media Hub.

The students come from all over the world, but the films they make engage primarily with local issues and topics, and offer their unique perspective on life in Austria.

Short documentaries

6:30 p.m.

Registration via web

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What is Cognitive Science? How to study the human mind?

In this series of talks, four researchers of the Department of Cognitive Science will share the highlights of their fields of research, illustrating the topics and diversity of cognitive science. You will discover different approaches to studying the human mind and learn about current topics from social and infant cognition research.

Experts Talks

The speakers will be:

  • 7 p.m.: Christophe Heintz (ACES lab - Adaptive Cognition and Economics in Society) - Is it rational to cooperate?
  • 7:15 p.m.: Natalie Sebanz (SOMBY lab - Social Mind and Body group) - How social are human minds?
  • 7:30 p.m.: Ágnes Melinda Kovacs (CDC - Cognitive Development Center) - Big minds in small bodies: How do babies think?
  • 7:45 p.m.: Azzurra Ruggeri (iSearch lab - Information Search, Ecological and Active learning Research with Children) - Why do children ask so many questions (and are the questions good?)

Entry only possible at 7 p.m.

Registration for the talk series via web

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How can we use data science for social good?

In this expert talk, Marton Karsai and Elisa Omodei will explain how digital data like satellite images, online social services, or mobility maps can be used to infer the socioeconomic status of people and places. You will also learn about examples of what these data can tell us about segregation patterns in social networks and mobility, and how it helps us to better understand the consequences of inequalities on the most vulnerable. 

Science Talk, 9:45 p.m.

Registration via web 

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Why (and how) do we cooperate?

Humans are successfully cooperating on a surprisingly large number of occasions. Is it because they are, fundamentally, nice? Is it because they just know how cooperation can work to their own interest? We study the motives and beliefs at the basis of cooperation. Visitors can play games that reveal their strategic thoughts and their social preferences (generosity, fairness, spite, etc.).

Experiment

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How to study the babies’ mind and their exceptional learning abilities?

A guided hands-on tour of the KiKo Research Center

Babies learn an impressive amount of things during the first years of life: how can we find out what they know about the world and how their learning unfolds? On a guided tour of the Kiko Research Center, you will discover modern research methods to study babies, such as eye-tracking and neuroimaging. You will have the opportunity to try out experiments in a hands-on manner. Kids and families are welcome to join!

Guided Tour

Registration via web: German and English 

5 p.m. (in German), 6 p.m. (in German), 8 p.m. (in English)

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Teamwork pays off - but how do you pick the best partners to cooperate with?

We study the development of children’s cooperative skills - especially the question how they choose good partners for collaborating. Try out the iPad research game we developed for this purpose and find out more about what makes a good team player and why it is important to recognize them.

Participation Station

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How can babies control a computer with their eyes and how to use eye movements to study their cognitive skills?

Eye tracking allows to detect a person’s gaze and follow in real time what they are looking at. Eye tracking is a great tool to study what babies and young children understand about the world and how they interact with technology before they can speak, manipulate objects, or walk. Stop by to try out some eye-tracking studies and experience how it feels to control a computer with your eyes.

Participation Station

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How effective are children's active learning strategies? How do children learn so much about the world and so efficiently?

The Max Planck Research Group iSearch investigates theoretically and empirically how children actively search for information in their physical and social environments to obtain clues for testing and revising their hypotheses over time. We have developed several fun tablet games aimed at comprehensively assessing children's active learning performance from a developmental perspective.

Participation Station

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Want to see how we study social minds? Come to our lab and take a tour!

The SOMBY Lab invites you for a guided tour in getting familiar with experiments studying perception, cognition, and action in a social context. The tour will be held by the Lab Managers and PhD students of the Lab.

Guided Tour

Registration via web

5:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m.

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What makes us act together?

Why do we prefer to load the dishwasher by ourselves but enjoy cooking with our partner? Why is it fun to solve a puzzle together but we prefer to solve arithmetics problems by ourselves? Every day we choose between doing things alone or together: how do we make such decisions? In this station we will show how we investigate such questions using coordination games played on a touchscreen.

Experiment

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How do we understand people through their movements?

What kinds of judgements do we make from the movements of those around us? Can we tell whether they are going to pour from a bottle or take a drink? Can we tell how confident they are when placing a bet? Can we understand their moral preferences? You will learn how we can use something as simple as a computer trackpad to tackle questions related to the social aspects of human movement and the perception thereof.

Experiment

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How do we like to coordinate with others? - A Joint Action experiment with Magic Balloons!

Why do we fall into synchrony when we are walking next to each other on the street? Why do we chant in unison, and why does it feel almost magical when we say the same thing at the same time without previously rehearsing it? At this station, you will get familiar with an experiment that aims to answer questions about an important and exciting element of movement coordination: synchronization.

Experiment

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What does research on social cognition look like?

Join us for a playful introduction!

Have you ever wondered how is it that we can so easily work with others, and achieve shared goals, without even thinking about it? How do our bodies and our brains make this happen? We offer a series of short tasks and interactive games to introduce different experiments and techniques researchers use to study questions about social cognition. Younger attendees are welcome to take part in fun activities (arts and crafts, coloring pages, ...) to learn about the human (social) brain.

Participation Station

* This station is offered in English, German, Bosnian/Serbian/Croatian, and Hungarian.

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Why do we rush in social interactions and what does it have to do with fireflies and sea shanties?

You will be able to participate in a short drumming experiment alone or together with others to experience how we investigate temporal coordination in humans. You will learn about how your social brain predicts others and how you adjust your actions to the actions of others. You will also experience what we might have in common with fireflies and why sea shanties were so important for sailors of the 19th century.

Experiment

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How to study how we identify with our computer game avatars?

When you play a computer game you often control a character that is different from how you look. In some way, when you play a game, you BECOME that character – your avatar. But what does it mean that you become your avatar? This station will show you how we try to answer this question. You will see what tasks our participants do and what equipment we use to record electrical signals from our participants’ brains.

Experiment

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How can nature help cities become more sustainable and liveable?

In the exhibition "Nature helps, even in cities!" visitors will understand how different forms of nature-based solutions (NBS) are being used to address various urban problems, through a series of comic-style illustrations. You will have a chance to interact with web-based tools, namely the Urban Nature Atlas, and explore the potential of urban nature based on a catalogue of over 1000 existing NBS projects.

Participation Station

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Experts Talk

Machines vs. Romance: Which Wins and When? / Makine ve Aşk: Hangisi Ne Zaman Üstün Gelir?

In the world of technology and automation, romantic partners impact how we behave. Imagine a scenario for a person named Alex. Alex decided to cook a gourmet dish for his/her potential romantic partner in one of their initial dates. Alex can cook the dish manually by using regular cookware or by using an automatic cooker. How will Alex cook the dish, with or without the automated products?

Experts Talk